Visual Accountability for Reinforcing Desired Behavior

 

Do you have a child that repeatedly continues an actions after you have tried a million and one times to stop it? I needed more than just a, “please stop blurting out”, comment to nip it in the bud. This blog post will give you a quick idea for reinforcing desired behavior with an individual behavior plan for those kids that need it!

Elementary teacher looking for something to change up behavior charts in the classroom? These classroom management ideas will help reinforce desired behavior

This ideas began because I have a blurter. We all have them. These are the kids that choose to blurt more than normal at certain times. I tried many tricks to make this blurter end her madness. I tried to reinforce only positives, I also kept reminding, but nothing seemed to work. It was getting to the point that this child would blurt out AS I WAS TALKING. That fact that I used all caps with that last sentence should tell you how frustrated I was starting to feel.  I sat down with my friend and explained the new tactic.

 

I would give her the strip that says, “I will not blurt in class”. I told her that she had five “free blurts” in the classroom for that day. If she blurted out, she had to give me one blurt cards on her strip. Of course, I explained to her what was considered a blurt in our classroom. If it is a free discussion time, she would obviously not be penalized. If she had any left by the end of the day, I would give her $3 in classroom money that she could use in our class store.

 

I printed out the strips and cards, and placed velcro dots to adhere them together.

 

Here is how it works:

I made this product with the the idea that the teacher who chooses to use this template can tailor the plan to the child’s personality. With some kids, taking away a card can be too much of a punishment. If the child needs constant positive reinforcement, you can choose to give the child a card when they exhibit the desired behavior, and then pay them for however many cards they receive by the end of the day. These cards can be used however it works best in your classroom.

There is also a strip for “restroom pass”. I have a sweet little girl that LOVES to just leave the room and venture the hallways. She’s smart and works hard, but she loves her bathroom time. I would never ever tell a child that they cannot go to the bathroom when they truly need to use the restroom. This little friend of mine, will ask to go 4 times in 2 hours, so a visual strip is necessary. I began using the strip as her bathroom passes. This made her more conscious with her trips to the restroom, by having her think if her asking was because she needed to go, or she just wanted to wander.

If you were thinking of a little friend as you were reading this post, click the image below or {here} to snag thee behavior plans.

Elementary teacher looking for something to change up behavior charts in the classroom? These classroom management ideas will help reinforce desired behavior

 

I hope this was a Peppy Zesty idea for you!

 

 

Amber

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